Posted by Sandra Tessier on 5/16/2017

There’s many different myths about buying a home that may have been presented to you as fact. All of these rumors could have you believing that being a home owner is a dream. Here, we’ll debunk some of the most common misconceptions about home buying and give you the tools to solve any issues that you may come across in the process of securing a home loan.


If You Don’t Have 20% To Put Down On A Home, You Can’t Buy


Many conventional loans do require a 20% down payment on a home. There’s also many different loans available that may suit your needs. From Federal Housing Administration loans to Veteran’s programs to down payment assistance programs, there’s many different things that can be done to help you buy a home. Keep in mind that any time you put less than 20% down, you’ll need to provide additional mortgage insurance, also known as PMI or private mortgage insurance.  


If Your Credit Score Is Terrible You’re Out Of Luck

If you want really good mortgage rates, having great credit is very important. If your credit score is low, your rates tend to be much higher. A really low credit score could keep you from getting a loan completely. FHA loans allow you to still qualify for a loan with a credit score as low as 580.


You Need To Make Bank To Get Money From The Bank


Monthly annual income is just one of the factors that’s considered when it comes to getting a loan to purchase a home. Your debts matter just as much if not more. People with significant credit card debt and other loans may be denied a home loan even if they have a substantial income. 


You’re In The Clear If You’re Pre-Qualified


Pre-qualification is much different than pre-approval. Pre-qualification involves giving your lender basic information about your finances in order to estimate how much of a loan you can get. This will give you a ballpark figure of about how much you’ll be able to borrow. Of course, this is very helpful in the home search process, but you’re not done. To get pre-approved, you’ll need a complete mortgage application in order to have your complete financial background check and credit rating.  


If You’ve Met One Real Estate Agent, You’ve Met Them All


This couldn’t be further from the truth. Your relationship with your real estate agent is going to be quite close. You’ll need to share somewhat personal information in order to secure a house you’ll love. Agents are involved in one of the biggest decisions that you’ll ever make. Each agent has his or her specialties and knows different neighborhoods better than others. Definitely go with a real estate agent that you feel comfortable with and knows their stuff.  


Closing Costs Aren’t Your Responsibility


Sometimes, sellers do pay the closing costs in the sale of a home. It all depends upon how the negotiations go with the home. You’ll need to be prepared for upfront costs in buying a home. These include a credit check, attorney fees and property insurance. As a buyer, you’ll be paying anywhere between 2 and 5 percent of the purchase price of the home.  


It’s important to be prepared and to stay informed in order to make sound financial decisions throughout the process of purchasing a home. Everything will be that much more exciting when you have all of the pertinent information that you’ll need.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Sandra Tessier on 4/19/2016

It is almost impossible to predict the future and predicting where mortgage rates may go can be difficult too. But if you know how to watch the indicators you will have some degree of advantage. It may help you decide whether to borrow funds or wait until rates drop. Consider that with any prediction there can always be a great deal of margin of error. Here are a few things to consider to make a more reliable mortgage rate prediction: History History can always be a good predictor. What is the economic climate? If rates are high in economic down times that you should predict that rates will rise when the same crisis hits the market. Look not only to long-term history but also to rates recent history. Watch for the changes carefully, track them by the month. Factors to consider are: Are the rates going up or down? What factors are causing them to behave in such a way? Influencing Factors Factors that influence mortgage rates can be controlled by you. One of those factors is the amount of down payment you have or if refinancing the amount of equity you have in the home. Also for consideration on the rate you will receive is your debt to income ratio and your credit score. Some factors you cannot influence include the state of the real estate market, the inflation rate and the funds available for consumers. Inflation Inflation drives most everything and always is a constant consideration of the mortgage interest. If inflation is higher, the interest rate will go up as well. Conversely, if inflation is low rates do down. Credit Availability How much credit is available? If limited funds are available than mortgage interest rates will be higher. The Bottom Line The bottom line is you have to be flexible. You can never predict what the exact mortgage rate will be. Instead, look to the factors that influence rates. This will give you an idea of where rates are and a better picture of if it is the right time for you to take on a mortgage.





Posted by Sandra Tessier on 5/27/2014

If you are in the market for a mortgage you will need to know how a lender determines if you are a good candidate for a loan. When you apply for a mortgage or look to refinance your current mortgage there is a mortgage loan underwriter who who has the job of reviewing your loan application and all of the accompanying documents. After you have completed all the paperwork on your end, you may be wondering what exactly is the underwriter looking for? Typically, the underwriter is looking for two things: 1.) your general creditworthiness and 2.) your debt-to-income ratio. How does an underwriter evaluate creditworthiness? Your creditworthiness will give the lender an idea of your willingness to repay your debts. The most common way to determine creditworthiness is to use your credit score. The lender usually uses your FICO (Fair Isaac Corporation) score. Your FICO score is based on an analysis of your various credit files by the three major credit repositories, Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. How does the underwriter determine debt-to-income ratio? The second thing the underwriter wants to determine is how the new mortgage payment will impact your ability to repay. The underwriter will use a calculation called debt-to-income ratio (DTI). When calculating DTI the underwriter compares your monthly gross income (before taxes) and your monthly debts. DTI requirements vary but typically the underwriter is looking to see if the ratio of debt to income— after the cost of your mortgage principal, interest, real estate taxes, insurance and any private mortgage insurance — is less than 40 percent. There are many other factors that go into whether or not you will be able to obtain a mortgage but these are two of the biggest factors.